Google+

Posts by Email:

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Southern Table Wine, the Making of a Healthy Choice


Hey y'all!
I am pretty much addicted "Southern Table Wine" or as it is known the more sinister moniker, "Diabetes Juice."
And with the amount of sugar that I liked in my sweet tea, the latter name may have been accurate.  I would put 1/2 cup or more of sugar per quart.  Now let me tell you, I am naturally a high energy person and all of that sugar and caffeine together would make "high energy" a huge understatement.   Manic might be a better word, and forget having it after 2pm if I wanted to sleep before 11pm that night.  You get the picture, not pretty and then the crash.  Even worse.

I began drinking decaffeinated tea years ago, and that helped.  However, it didn't take away my sugar high and crash nor the negative side affects that consuming that much sugar on a regular basis would cause.

Then I discovered Stevia a naturally sweet herb!  But beware many sweeteners that are parading as being "true" or "raw" actually use dextrose, a man made substance.  The 2 brands I have found that only use Stevia and its derivatives are "Sweet Leaf" and "Stevita" (from Brazil).  FYI,  Stevia has been shown to lower your blood pressure and blood sugar in studies--good for some, bad for others.  I am not sure that less than a teaspoon a day would matter at all, but I wanted to let you know.  It's a lot less side effects than excessive sugar.

I make Healthy Lemonade using it too:

There are all kinds of benefits to drinking black tea, though you usually only hear about green tea.  You can google it and justify your habit as a healthy choice, as I do.  :o)   However, you shouldn't over indulge any tea as you might negate the benefits of a healthy amount.  Also, tea, like calcium, will cut down on your body's ability to absorb iron.  So take your multivitamins or iron supplements a few hours before or after enjoying it.

I like Tetley or Luzianne decaffeinated teas in the family size pouches.  Lipton is okay if you don't over steep it.  Pull it out after 3-5 minutes because it will become more and more bitter, like most teas, by leaving it over that point.  This doesn't bother me with the Tetley or Luzianne and even when Lipton is properly steeped it is my last choice.  However, I know many people who prefer Lipton's, so use what you like if you already have a preference.

Here's the recipe:
4 c. Water
1 family sized tea bag or 2 individual bags 
1 tsp of Stevia or less if this is too sweet for you
Optional additions:
1 tsp of sugar or honey or agave nectar (low glycemic index) to make it a little sweeter and fuller in flavor
wedge of lemon
sprig of mint or bit of dried mint
small piece of peeled ginger (good for an upset stomach)

Making the tea:
Bring your water to the boiling point and pour over your tea bags into a container that already has your Stevia and any desired options in it.  Steep to your desired time.  Remove your tea bags, stir, and serve over glasses filled with ice.  Enjoy!





14 comments:

  1. I love Stevia. I have been putting it in my tea for quite a while now. I carry packets of "Stevia in the Raw" with me, I will have to look for the brands you mentioned. One note - my cousin, who doesn't care for flavored teas, finds Stevia makes her tea "too fruity tasting". I love flavored teas so I don't have that problem with it. I'll have to make some lemonade with it, I bet that is delicious, too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha! I carry Stevita packets. :o) When you find a good thing, why not bring it along? That's funny that she thinks it makes things fruity. I have always thought that a heavy hand with it made it licorice-y tasting. I don't really like fruity teas, I like it spicey, minty, or with slight citrus notes, in black or green. I have tried many fruity teas, but they aren't my thing. I have 2 breakfast favorites right now, one is a coconut black Chai and a loose leaf organic Earl Grey. What's your favorite?

      Delete
  2. Hello, Charlie! I grew my own stevia plant last year (I still have it in a pot, almost ready to harvest) and made my own stevia syrup. It isn't hard to do. Also, you can just muddle a few stevia leaves in lemon juice, add water and - presto - lemonade without the sugar! The plant is really pretty and is almost ornamental. In fact, I made a bouquet with some of it's pretty delicate white flowers last year! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds amazing! I am going to have to look it to that. I love fresh herbs and it's always fun to help something grow. Thanks for sharing Vickie! :o)

      Delete
  3. Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!

    Thanks again for joining the Link Up this week!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Charlie, I'll have to try it your way sometime. We are tea lovers all summer long! Mostly unsweetened with lemon but, on occasion we love sweet tea. Thanks for sharing @DearCreatives and hope your having a great week. Theresa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you enjoy it! :o) Thanks & thanks for hosting!

      Delete
  5. I have heard of Stevia but after all the fake sugars I was reluctant to try. I guess you'll never know if you dont try though. Thanks for linking up to Snickerdoodle Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can understand that. It's great to have found an herbal sweetener that I love, just make sure that the one you buy is pure stevia in the ingredients section. I hope you enjoy it! :o) Thanks & thanks for hosting!

      Delete
  6. We use to call my dad's tea "syrup" due to the amount of sugar he puts in it. We;ll have to try this recipe. Thanks for Sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I probably would have liked your dad's tea! Hahaha! Well, mine is definitely different but I like it and I hope you do too. :o) Thanks for coming by.

      Delete
  7. Wow, thanks so much for sharing another wonderful post with us at Creative Spark Link Party! I am a sweet-tea-a-holic, so I'll have to give this a try!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are welcome. Thanks for stopping by, I hope you enjoy it!

      Delete